Pastor OlsenRev. Peter A. Olsen

Pastor OlsenRev. Rachel M. Zarnke

From the Pastor's Desk

August 2016

My mom was one of the most politically correct people I have ever known. She would not have agreed with the dubious proposition that a person should speak whatever is on his or her mind. "If you can't speak kindly of someone else," she used to say, "keep your mouth shut." That rule applied even when my unkind remarks were true. For example, there was no denying that old Mr. Salter who lived a block away was an ornery old cuss that hated children. Once when I accidentally kicked my soccer ball into his front lawn, he promptly stepped out the door, picked up the ball and took it into his house. I had a few choice words for him that day.

When I got home, I told Mom all about it. She informed me that she would take care of getting my ball back and I was to apologize to Mr. Salter. "Why?" I demanded. "It was an accident and it didn't do any harm. The ball landed on the grass! Nothing got broke and I wouldn't even have had to step on his lawn if he'd just let me pick it up!" "Not the point," Mom replied. "Mr. Salter feels that you have disrespected him. He needs to know that he has our respect. It doesn't matter who was right or wrong here. What matters is that we be good neighbors to each other."

Mom was particularly intolerant of jokes and derisive comments directed to people with disabilities. I once called one of my friends a "retard" for reasons I no longer remember. I meant it as a joke and my friend took it that way, but Mom called me on it and delivered a stern rebuke. "But it was just a joke!" I explained. "It was between him and me. There were no other people around to hear it and be hurt." "I heard it," said Mom, "and it hurt me. Think about it. If you or somebody you cared about had a mental disability, would you want to hear an ugly word like that? Put yourself in somebody else's shoes for once."

For the same reason, too, racial epitaphs were forbidden in our home and that rule applied whether there were persons of color within ear shot or not. "The way you talk about people shows how you feel about them and whether you respect them," she said. Mom taught us to practice respect whenever we opened our mouths so that we would grow up to be respectful.

Mom always believed that you "can't judge a book by its cover." So I doubt she would understand why so many people in our country feel that a Muslim cannot be a good citizen or why a judge of some particular ethnic background other than her own could not be fair and impartial or why you would automatically be fearful of someone simply because of where they come from, what language they speak or how they look. I also doubt she would find the rude, crude and insulting language oozing out from the internet, talk radio and political conventions much to her liking. It isn't that Mom couldn't be forceful and assertive. She could be plenty assertive when she had to be. But she never lost sight of the humanity of the people she confronted. However much she might have disagreed with what someone else had said or done, she never failed to respect them or treat them as anything less than a human being loved by God and created in God's image. No doubt about it, Mom was politically correct-only we didn't call it politically correct back then. We just called it good manners.

Pastor Olsen